Drupal to WordPress Migration

I tried … I REALLY tried, but sometimes breakups are necessary when the relationship becomes too lopsided to save. I have had a Drupal-based website for 8 years and 22 months (as I was reminded when I logged in after months of absence yesterday). However, I have long considered it an abusive relationship that needed to stop for my own good. There is no question that Drupal is an amazing tool, but a tool that makes you work hard to make it work hard. It all became … well … too hard. I have been able to keep things current with “minor” updates (each taking me at least an hour), but I have now thrown in the towel after attempting (numerous times) to make a major upgrade to the most current version. Admittedly, I don’t know enough to know WHY it has been unsuccessful, but I’m 99% sure it has to do with the nearly 9-year-old database. Reading through the support forums, it seems bad things happen to the database when one makes multiple unsuccessful attempts to upgrade. Stuff inevitably gets added / deleted / moved, and while you can (and I did) “revert” back to the saved stable database, little buggers linger to mess stuff up (see … I really don’t know what I’m talking about / doing).

So, while I could make this a very long and sad breakup story, I’ll instead focus on a positive new relationship. Through my frustrated Google searching for Drupal solutions, I re-stumbled on an organization that helps people like me out of bad relationships with their CMS … see http://www.cms2cms.com/ … I have truly no idea how the magic happens, but for $90 (in my case) I was able to migrate my Drupal content into this WordPress installation in less time that it took me to steep my afternoon tea. For all I know, they are horrid evil doers who embed nasty tracking code in your website (although I found no such evidence of this on the interwebs, or so far in my own experience), but man is the process slick. On their website, you type in the URLs of your “leaving” and “moving to” websites, download a wee file that you upload to both sites, pay a “reasonable” (IMHO) migration fee, and *poof* you have a lovely new website with all of your old data and posts migrated in under 5 minutes. I still have some things to tidy up (particularly the attachments to posts that are *there*, but not appearing), but really no different than if I changed a theme in Drupal.

I’m not sure this new home will get me back to regular blogging, but the conditions are far more favorable. Time will tell …

 

Angst

What better way to dust off the old blog than a post about angst. As a long time online learner and now instructor / instructional designer, I see (and feel) a lot of online learning angst … most of it having something to do with MOOCs, a concept I have followed closely and watched evolve ever since my experience in David Wiley's Introduction to Open Education in 2007, my observations of the pioneering efforts of Alec Couros to open up the walled gardens in early 2008, and in following the Connectivism MOOC later in 2008. Rightly or wrongly (it feels wrongly at the moment), I haven't spent much effort recently dissecting my perceptions of this angst, most likely because my contemplative platform on EdTechWeekly … and this blog … have gone dark. However, I have also been silent because it has become extremely hard for me to integrate my conceptions of online learning, open education … and yes, even MOOCs … that I developed over years within a small echo chamber with the conceptions that are bombarding me now that the masses have arrived. While many of the words are the same, the definitions, missions, perceptions, visions, etc. are decidedly different and it is pains me to have to parse, quantify, and qualify those differences in order to engage in this enlarged conversation. It requires me to step back (years back) and re-think / re-imagine with a different audience, one that doesn't knowingly nod at my snarky sighs and comments. Therefore, I'm posing a challenge to myself … to re-engage in the conversation … and this is my start (I hope).

σκυλοτροφη Οι σκυλοτροφες, οπως η ξηρα τροφη για σκυλους, οι κονσέρβες για σκυλουσς και οι λιχουδιές για σκυλους, αποτελούν οτι χρειάζεται καθημερινά ο σκύλος σας. Το barfing ή ωμοφαγία ειναι να ταϊζουνε τον σκυλο μας ωμο κρεας. Τα petshop ειναι Online μαγαζια που εχουν τροφές και οτι αλλο χρειαζεται ο σκυλος σας και τα υπολοιπα κατοικιδια. Οι ρατσες σκυλων ειναι παρα πολλες. Για καθε ρατσα υπαρχουν διαφορετικα προιοντα σκυλων. Τα κουταβια ειναι τα μικρα σκυλακια που μπορεις να τα αγορασεις απο τα petshop αγορα σκυλου.

EdStartup101 Introduction

I wanted to expand on my video introduction to attempt to clarify a few of my remarks that didn’t exactly hit the mark when I listened back to my on-the-fly video. I said (or tried to say) something along the lines of, “our virtual network has been good at starting conversations about issues, but they haven’t seemed to be as effective as a means to implement solutions” … or something like that.

I think an example would help to illustrate my point. As I mentioned in my intro, I’ve hung out my freelance shingle and I’ve been pleasantly surprised at the ease in which potential projects (or problems / needs / opportunities) have come my way. Seems the world has lots and lots of issues / problems / needs / gaps / opportunities looking for solutions. However, as one lonely gal sitting in my home office in Chicago … I am quickly realizing that collaboration is essential to take on the projects that I want to do … and projects that real live actual PEOPLE want to have done (as opposed to the solutions looking for problems that we educators / designers / fill-in-blank love to tweet and blog about).

So, one day this summer I received a “cold call” email on my website contact form from someone who works for a non-profit in Chicago. She was in need of “instructional materials” to be made for her volunteers to use when they go into high schools to talk about drug addiction. She knows a lot about the drug addiction part, but less so about the creating “instructional materials” part. Our initial phone conversation quickly led me to believe that some of the best solutions I could come up with on the fly were likely going to beyond my technical expertise … and the initial problem she contacted me to solve. Rather than just pumping out some content-heavy instructional material (print or Flash based), my mind jumped ahead and I started asking her about the other layers of her needs. At one layer .. yes .. they need instructional content … but they also appeared to have deeper and far more complex needs, such as the need for a repository to store, categorize, and share these resources, and an online place that both learners and educators could use as a learning space or home base. While I’m as good as the next gal at setting up my own Moodle or Word Press blog, my talents don’t stretch nearly as far as my ideas.

So … I headed out to my virtual network to see if I could get any takers to partner up with me on this project. While I had a HUGE response from current instructional design students in need of project experience (not something my contact was much interested in … nor was I much interested in taking on in a mentor role at the time), I heard crickets when I reached out to “experts” in my virtual network. Therefore, I let the project go … as I’ve said many times on EdTechWeekly, “It is hard to collaborate alone.” Do not even think about stealing that as your next book title … I reserve all rights :)

On a pragmatic level, I totally get it … people have jobs, lives, families, their own pet projects. And … this project was small, probably not a lot of money, and likely messier than I am painting it here … and a whole host of other reasons not to do it. Again, I get it … I’m as good a naysayer as the next person … after all, I was a casualty insurance underwriter for 15 years… I was paid big bucks to say, “no” to coverage requests.

But, on a zealous level, we (as a virtual network) seem to have plenty of time to pontificate … and plenty of things to say about how our solutions to the world’s educational problems are the most enlightened and exciting. Yet, beyond talking, how great are we as a virtual network at DOING … actually helping to solve problems like the one I presented, or do we need to leave that to the traditional and formal organizations .. the educational institutions and instructional design firms that we so often criticize and make the butt of our edupunk jokes? [btw ... an instructional design firm DID end up bidding on the project.]

Which brings me to my questions … can we leverage the brain trust in our loosely joined virtual network of experts to DO something when asked? To collectively work together when called upon? Is the virtual network best served for lip service / sharing of ideas / here’s a link to the latest and coolest resource? Or … can we work together to DO something? To do someTHING that actually matters to those outside of the echo chamber of our virtual network? Solving a problem that someone brings to us? A need that someone else identifies. Taking action that will move a solution forward. Can there be collective ACTION in our weak tie virtual network? Is the strength in our weak tie virtual network ONLY the diffusion of ideas (and, I know … professional development) and NOT collective action, as research has already suggested. If so, that makes me sad, because I want desperately for my virtual network connections to be able to BOTH diffuse information AND to take collective action when called upon.

Clearly, there are some great examples out there where the virtual network has rallied around a cause, but the initiatives that come to mind are largely driven by a few dedicated souls (benevolent dictators as Jeff Lebow calls them) with a hodgepodge of very well intentioned volunteer helpers who may be excited and engaged for a while, but also may disappear as quickly. For example, Wayne Mackintosh with OER University is one of the best examples I can come up with right now … and, yes .. I fall into the well-intentioned disappearing lurker category in the examples that come to mind.

So, in a nutshell, this is what I want to ponder. Is there a way we can leverage the relationships in our virtual network to take collective action when called upon? Can we WORK with our virtual network at a level beyond volunteering …dare I say to make a LIVING in partnership with my virtual network contacts? Maybe all I’m suggesting is a virtual instructional design firm with a loosely tied cluster of (strong tie) interested participants? Maybe that wouldn’t be a bad start …

EdStartup101 Introduction Part II

I wanted to expand on my video introduction to attempt to clarify a few of my remarks that didn’t exactly hit the mark when I listened back to my on-the-fly video. I said (or tried to say) something along the lines of, “our virtual network has been good at starting conversations about issues, but they haven’t seemed to be as effective as a means to implement solutions” … or something like that.

I think an example would help to illustrate my point. As I mentioned in my intro, I’ve hung out my freelance shingle and I’ve been pleasantly surprised at the ease in which potential projects (or problems / needs / opportunities) have come my way. Seems the world has lots and lots of issues / problems / needs / gaps / opportunities looking for solutions. However, as one lonely gal sitting in my home office in Chicago … I am quickly realizing that collaboration is essential to take on the projects that I want to do … and projects that real live actual PEOPLE want to have done (as opposed to the solutions looking for problems that we educators / designers / fill-in-blank love to tweet and blog about).

So, one day this summer I received a “cold call” email on my website contact form from someone who works for a non-profit in Chicago. She was in need of “instructional materials” to be made for her volunteers to use when they go into high schools to talk about drug addiction. She knows a lot about the drug addiction part, but less so about the creating “instructional materials” part. Our initial phone conversation quickly led me to believe that some of the best solutions I could come up with on the fly were likely going to beyond my technical expertise … and the initial problem she contacted me to solve. Rather than just pumping out some content-heavy instructional material (print or Flash based), my mind jumped ahead and I started asking her about the other layers of her needs. At one layer .. yes .. they need instructional content … but they also appeared to have deeper and far more complex needs, such as the need for a repository to store, categorize, and share these resources, and an online place that both learners and educators could use as a learning space or home base. While I’m as good as the next gal at setting up my own Moodle or Word Press blog, my talents don’t stretch nearly as far as my ideas.

So … I headed out to my virtual network to see if I could get any takers to partner up with me on this project. While I had a HUGE response from current instructional design students in need of project experience (not something my contact was much interested in … nor was I much interested in taking on in a mentor role at the time), I heard crickets when I reached out to “experts” in my virtual network. Therefore, I let the project go … as I’ve said many times on EdTechWeekly, “It is hard to collaborate alone.” Do not even think about stealing that as your next book title … I reserve all rights :)

On a pragmatic level, I totally get it … people have jobs, lives, families, their own pet projects. And … this project was small, probably not a lot of money, and likely messier than I am painting it here … and a whole host of other reasons not to do it. Again, I get it … I’m as good a naysayer as the next person … after all, I was a casualty insurance underwriter for 15 years… I was paid big bucks to say, “no” to coverage requests.

But, on a zealous level, we (as a virtual network) seem to have plenty of time to pontificate … and plenty of things to say about how our solutions to the world’s educational problems are the most enlightened and exciting. Yet, beyond talking, how great are we as a virtual network at DOING … actually helping to solve problems like the one I presented, or do we need to leave that to the traditional and formal organizations .. the educational institutions and instructional design firms that we so often criticize and make the butt of our edupunk jokes? [btw ... an instructional design firm DID end up bidding on the project.]

Which brings me to my questions … can we leverage the brain trust in our loosely joined virtual network of experts to DO something when asked? To collectively work together when called upon? Is the virtual network best served for lip service / sharing of ideas / here’s a link to the latest and coolest resource? Or … can we work together to DO something? To do someTHING that actually matters to those outside of the echo chamber of our virtual network? Solving a problem that someone brings to us? A need that someone else identifies. Taking action that will move a solution forward. Can there be collective ACTION in our weak tie virtual network? Is the strength in our weak tie virtual network ONLY the diffusion of ideas (and, I know … professional development) and NOT collective action, as research has already suggested. If so, that makes me sad, because I want desperately for my virtual network connections to be able to BOTH diffuse information AND to take collective action when called upon.

Clearly, there are some great examples out there where the virtual network has rallied around a cause, but the initiatives that come to mind are largely driven by a few dedicated souls (benevolent dictators as Jeff Lebow calls them) with a hodgepodge of very well intentioned volunteer helpers who may be excited and engaged for a while, but also may disappear as quickly. For example, Wayne Mackintosh with OER University is one of the best examples I can come up with right now … and, yes .. I fall into the well-intentioned disappearing lurker category in the examples that come to mind.

So, in a nutshell, this is what I want to ponder. Is there a way we can leverage the relationships in our virtual network to take collective action when called upon? Can we WORK with our virtual network at a level beyond volunteering …dare I say to make a LIVING in partnership with my virtual network contacts? Maybe all I’m suggesting is a virtual instructional design firm with a loosely tied cluster of (strong tie) interested participants? Maybe that wouldn’t be a bad start …